For Schools

When teachers deliver tobacco education in the classroom, they are helping young people to make informed choices in a supportive and ongoing way.

A key tenet of the Health Promoting Schools Framework is the adoption of a whole of school approach which recognises the substantial contribution the school community provides to students’ health and wellbeing across a variety of areas – including reducing tobacco use.

The Smarter than Smoking campaign has been providing smoking prevention resources to WA schools since 1996. Within this site, there are teaching and learningresources that will support teachers in educating young people about tobacco and smoking related issues. Additional school resources for tobacco and smoking related issues are available from SDERA (School Drug Education and Road Aware) and other smoking prevention  websites.

Evidence

The National Preventative Health Strategy supports using materials in the curriculum that increase understanding of the short and longer term effects of smoking. The National Tobacco Strategy 2012-2018 highlighted the need for a greater focus on protecting children from tobacco, discouraging uptake of smoking among young people and reshaping social norms about smoking, particularly among disadvantaged groups.

Tobacco education is identified as a Health and Physical Education Learning Area focus within the Western Australian Curriculum Health and Physical Education Syllabus. The lesson plans provided have been updated from the existing Smarter than Smoking resources 'Ideas Kit for Upper Primary Teachers' and 'Keeping Ahead of the Pack'..

Throughout our resources, the term 'smoke-free' refers both to young people not smoking themselves and protecting themselves from second-hand smoke (also referred to as passive or side-stream smoke).

Whole School Drug Education Plan

A Whole School Drug Education Plan aims to keep young people safer and encourage a shared commitment to drug education between staff, students and parents. A plan that is developed in consultation with school community members, and is clear and well communicated, is more likely to be implemented effectively.